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Nucleus and Microtubules

Cultured epithelial cells have been processed and fluorescently stained to show the distributions of microtubules and the nucleus. Microtubules (in green) are part of the cell's cytoskeleton and serve several functions within the cell. They act as a structural support to provide rigidity and in some cell types (such as neurons) assist in establishing cellular polarity. In addition, microtubules serve as tracks along which intracellular cargoes are carried by motor proteins. This type of intracellular transport ensures that cellular structures, such as organelles, are accurately placed to perform their various functions.

Nucleus (blue) and Microtubles (green)

The nucleus (in blue) is a crucial cell organelle. It is where most of the cell's hereditary material is stored and replicated. The major components of the nucleus include the chromosomes, one or more nucleoli, and the nuclear envelope. The hereditary material present in the nucleus is located in chromatin, a complex of DNA, protein, and RNA. Chromatin is found in an extended state in non-dividing cells, such as the one depicted here. It is found in a condensed state, known as chromosomes, during cell division. Cells were processed using gluteraldehyde fixation and stained with fluorescein-conjugated antibodies to tubulin to see microtubules and a chromamycin stain specific for DNA to view the nucleus.

For further information on the nucleus and microtubules, click the images below.

Nucleus and MicrotubulesNucleus and Microtubules

Another subset of cells were processed using similar fixation, but stained with rhodamine-conjugated antibodies to tubulin to see microtubules (red) and sytox green to view the nucleus.

For further information on the nucleus and microtubules, click the images below.

Nucleus and MicrotubulesNucleus and Microtubules
Nucleus and MicrotubulesNucleus and Microtubules


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